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What Children Believe

I read an article in Reader’s Digest about silly things people believed when they were kids and I knew my friends had such stories. Things they thought were true, but weren’t.

Mary Jo showed her three-year-old son a picture of her mother and explained that his grandmother was dead. Mary Jo asked if he knew what that meant. Her son responded, “Yes, it means the batteries ran down.”

Brenda believed the sun and the moon were the same because she never saw them in the sky together.

Amy was sure there really was a man in the moon. She was so afraid of him she wouldn’t look out a big living room window when the moon was full.

Elaine made sure her bedroom window blinds were down at night because she believed UFOs would get in her room if she didn’t.

Anita thought when it rained God was crying and storms meant that God was angry with folks who didn’t behave.

Jan believed that the only thing people did in Heaven was float on big clouds. She didn’t think that was interesting and couldn’t understand the hype she heard in Sunday school classes.

Dana believed a baby’s first clothes were made from threads the mother accidentally swallowed while sewing.   Babies were born wearing pretty rompers. She also thought all women were good seamstresses because those in her family were.

My son thought everyone’s mom had summers off work. “You, Aunt Brenda, Jan and Marilyn (neighbors) were off. I thought that’s just the way it was.” We were all public school teachers.

 

Seeing pictures of penguins in books and on television, Andrea thought penguins were huge, six feet tall. She was surprised when she saw a live one.

Julie was young when she found a cicada wing, a big see-through wing with black veins. She was sure it was a fairy wing and saved it, wrapped in cotton and inside a tiny box, for a long time.

Kae’s older sister, by 8 years, told her the police dropped her off for her family to take care of and if she ever told a lie, or even fibbed a little, the family was to call the police to come back and take her away. For several years, Kae believed her.

Sara’s dad, a doctor, delivered one of her male classmates on exactly the same day she was born. Sara’s older brother said the babies were switched so her family would have a girl. As elementary students, Sara and the boy had the same eye and hair color and the boy’s name was her father’s middle name. Sara believed.

Janna thought people in jail were in charge of changing the traffic lights.

Hearing a song on the radio, I thought the singer stood in the radio station building and sang into a microphone. My big brother laughed hard when I wondered how the singers travelled to different towns so fast.

These beliefs make me smile. Being naïve, the innocence of children.

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