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You got any Strawberry Jam?

“Hey, Gran, you got any strawberry jam?” When my Grands ask this, they mean homemade Strawberry Freezer Jam and they know the answer is yes.  

            As long as I can slice and chop and stir and pour, there’ll always be strawberry jam in my freezer.  It’s a family tradition. Mom served homemade jellies and jams alongside hot Martha White biscuits, and her strawberry jam was my favorite.

            After I married, Mom gave me jars of strawberry jam for my birthday. It was a gift of work and love; she picked the berries from Dad’s and her strawberry patch and washed, chopped, and cooked. My children ate peanut butter and strawberry jam sandwiches so I get a bit sentimental when my Grands do the same.

            Last week as I watched twelve-year-old Annabel stir peanut butter and jam together in a bowl and then spread it on bread to make her sandwich, I remembered that both her mother and I had done the same at her age. And another Grand, age 10, takes PB & J sandwiches in his school lunch bag every day so he makes five sandwiches at one time and freezes them to have throughout the week. 

            Strawberry jam isn’t just for biscuits and sandwiches.  Have you tried it on cornbread?  That’s 10-year-old Lucy’s favorite.  Her older sister, Elsie slathers sour dough rolls with butter and jam.   Muffins baked with a spoonful of jam in the middle are a treat. A plain soda cracker topped with strawberry jam would probably be tasty – a bite of salty sweetness.

            Strawberry Freezer Jam could be called Congealed Strawberry Sugar since the ingredients are twice as much sugar as fruit and pectin.  One time to cut cost, I used a less expensive store-brand sugar and the jam never “set-up,” but it was delicious ice cream topping.  I learned my lesson: use name brand, high quality sugar. 

            But all pectin may be the same. Because only store-brand pectin was available where I shopped recently, I took a chance and bought two boxes.  Last week, I made six recipes of jam, four with expensive name brand pectin that I’d bought earlier, and two with the cheaper store-brand.  There’s not a smidgen of difference in the taste or consistency.  

            I’m sentimental about jam jars.  Store bought jelly jars and recycled grape jelly jars work well, but my granny’s snuff glasses with tin tops that Mom filled fifty years ago are my favorites.  Last week, my Grand teased me as she wiped clean the tops of the filled jars and put lids on them.  “Gran, what if someone thinks it’s snuff?” she asked.   

            Six recipes make a lot of jam – thirty cups!  All eight Grands, those who live across town and those who live an airplane ride away, eat it.  And jam in tightly sealed plastic containers travels well inside a suitcase.

            A day spent making jam is a day well spent.  It isn’t just about good eating for my Grands – it’s also reliving happy memories.

Bacon is Mighty Good Eating

Bacon doesn’t have to be cooked in long, flat slices.  Twist it, roll it, or fold it.  

            Bacon spirals are the all the rage, according to some online sources, and they are simple to make.  Preheat the oven to 350º or 375ºF and line a baking sheet, that has sides, with aluminum foil.  Spray the foil with a cooking spray.  Twist each piece of bacon a few times and place it on baking sheet.  Bake about 30 minutes until the bacon is browned and crisp enough to hold its shape. 

            Because the bacon is twisted, many slices can be baked on one pan.  To make Spiced Bacon Twists, coat slices with a mixture of brown sugar, mustard powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cayenne pepper.    

            While reading online about bacon spirals, an advertisement for bacon roses popped up.  A half-dozen bacon roses in a vase is $45.00 and a dozen in a loose bouquet is available for $66.00.  Prices don’t include tax and shipping.  There are special offers for Father’s Day gifts, and the ad boasts that bacon roses were popular gifts for Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day.

            What’s a bacon rose?  A bacon slice rolled tightly and topped with brown sugar.  You can make this special gift.  Thread a toothpick through a bacon strip at one end, then roll up tightly about one-third of the way.  Twist the bacon strip clockwise to form points for rose petals.  Secure the bottom of the rolled bacon with two crisscrossed toothpicks so the rose will stand up. 

            Place bacon roses on a foil-lined baking pan with sides or in a muffin tin. Sprinkle each rose with a pinch of brown sugar and bake about 20 minutes in a 400 ºF oven.  Cool, remove the toothpicks, and stick a skewer into the bottom of each rose so it looks like a rose on a stem.  Your cost will be much less than $66.00 per dozen.

            Bacon roses aren’t as delicious as Special Oven Bacon, a tried-and-true recipe. Lay thick bacon slices, cut in half, on a broiling pan or a baking pan. Sprinkle a mixture of ¾ cup brown sugar and one heaping tablespoon flour over the bacon.  Then sprinkle with ½ cup finely chopped pecans and bake at 350º F for thirty minutes. 

            Have you tried folded bacon?  When my friend served really thick short slices of bacon, I learned a new way to cook it.  Fold a slice in half, end to end, and then cook your favorite way – fried in a black skillet, baked in the oven, or microwaved.  Folded bacon cooks evenly and the perfect size for a BLT, and it’s easy – much too easy – to pick up for a mid-morning snack.

            I baked a whole pan of bacon – some twisted, some rolled, some folded.  No matter the shape, crispy bacon is mighty good eating.  As long as it’s ‘pig bacon,’ as my Grand said when he was 5, and not turkey bacon that his mother sometimes served.

P. S. Because I made only 4 roses, I baked them in ramekins.

How to Cook Bacon

It’s easy to fry bacon like our grandmothers did.  They put bacon slices in black iron skillets and fried it until it was done. Now, detailed directions are printed on packages:  place bacon slices in a single layer in an unheated skillet.  Cook on medium heat 8-10 minutes or to desired crispness, turning occasionally. 

            You might follow the microwave directions.  Line a microwavable plate with three layers of paper towels.  Lay bacon slices in a single layer on the towels and cover with another towel.  Microwave about one minute per slice, depending on desired doneness. 

            What if you want to cook a lot of bacon? Bake it in the oven. Preheat the oven to 400°F and line a large baking sheet with foil. Place bacon slices in a single layer on the baking sheet.  Bake until desired crispness, 15 to 25 minutes. 

            I’ve used all three methods and there are pros and cons. Bacon is crispier when fried the old-fashioned way in a skillet.  To get good bacon drippings for a mess of fresh green beans or to grease a black skillet to bake cornbread, fry bacon.  But frying makes a mess; the grease splatters everywhere. 

            A slice of bacon never gets done evenly in the microwave.  It’s hard to know how long to cook it because some slices are thinner, some thicker, and microwaves are different.  A friend owns a pan especially made for cooking bacon in the microwave and she swears by it.

            I bake bacon if I need more than a few slices.  About thirty years ago when I worked in the kitchen at a boys’ summer camp, I learned to bake it. It takes a lot of bacon to feed 100 boys!  After cleaning up after supper, we kitchen help filled huge pans, the size that fits inside industrial ovens, with over 300 bacon slices.  The next morning, we put the pans in cold ovens and turned the oven temperature to 400°FThe bacon cooked while Mrs. White mixed, rolled, and cut out biscuits, and the rest of us cracked eggs to be scrambled and got out fruit, jelly, and juice.  By then, the bacon would be done. 

            A few years ago, Husband helped at a fund-raiser pancake breakfast and learned a different way to cook bacon.  Drop slices in a big kettle of hot grease.  No doubt that works well if you’re outside and have a long-handled scooper.

            I’m told that bacon cooked in an air fryer is the best ever. “Crunchy outside, chewy inside, dark around the edges…just perfect!” an ad reads.  When I get an air fryer, I’ll try it.

            I was inspired to write this column when I read that spiral twisted bacon cooks best and I saw a recipe for bacon roses, but I got side-tracked thinking of the many ways to cook one of my favorite meats.  Next Wednesday, I’ll write about spiral bacon and bacon roses. Be sure you have brown sugar on hand.

The Best Lunch

When Gloria said, “I had the best lunch Saturday,” I wanted to know exactly what she ate. I didn’t expect her to say, “A fried bologna sandwich.”

            Fried bologna.  I could almost smell it cooking in my black skillet, the same one Mom used. When I was a kid, bologna sandwiches, sometimes fried, were often Saturday lunches and they weren’t my favorite. We ate bologna between two slices of soft white bread slathered with Miracle Whip.

            Surely, Gloria’s lunch was better than what I remember eating. “How did you make your sandwich?” I asked. 

            Buy thick sliced beef bologna.  Cut three small slits around the edge of the slice so it will stay flat when it’s cooked.  Brown both sides of the meat in a skillet, using the medium heat setting.  Spread mayonnaise on both pieces of bread. Put lettuce on first so the bread won’t get soggy.  Layer sliced tomato, pickles, fried bologna, cheese, and the other piece of bread. 

            What kind of bread and pickles?  Any special mayo and cheese?  Gloria’s favorites are wheat bread, bread and butter pickles, Hellmann’s or Dukes mayo, and cheddar cheese.  “Other kinds of pickles could work,” Gloria explained, “but they should be sweet pickles and it could be American cheese.” 

            It’s been a long time since I’ve eaten a sandwich with just bologna, but it does add flavor to a deli sandwich I make with ham, roast beef, and two kinds of cheese.  I’m one of those people who wonders what bologna is made from and if I really knew, would I ever eat it?

            One well-known bologna label lists mechanically separated meats (chicken or turkey or pork or beef), water, corn syrup, salt, dextrose, mustard, sodium phosphate, sodium propionate, potassium chloride, beef juices, sodium ascorbate, sodium nitrite, sodium benzoate, flavor, hydrolyzed beef stock, extractives of paprika, and celery seed extract.  (Now I know why sodium is at the top of the nutritional listing.)

            If I had to explain to people who don’t know what bologna is and I want them to eat it, I definitely wouldn’t encourage them to google the word.  I found it’s a cooked, smoked sausage made of cured pork or beef or a mixture of the two.  It might include choice cuts, but usually contains afterthoughts of the meat industry – organs, trimmings, end pieces and so on.  Who wants to eat afterthoughts? 

            Bologna is a throw-back food that takes us to the 1950s when a bologna sandwiches were staples in lunchboxes, those carried by students and factory workers.  And most were like Mom’s, a piece of meat between white bread.  Later bologna fell out of favor when people became more conscious of healthy eating, but it’s made a comeback in recent years.  Maybe we need a little nostalgia in our lives.

            I haven’t tried Gloria’s sandwich yet, but I will.  And I’ll take the advice I discovered on an online advertisement: don’t think about how your bologna is made or what exactly it’s made from, and just sit there peacefully and eat your sandwich.

It Wouldn’t Be Summer Without Pickles

Twenty pounds is a lot of cucumbers.  What was I thinking? 

              I wanted two crock churns, not just one, filled with sweet pickles like Mom used to make. Forty years ago, she gave me the recipe that she wrote on a 3” x 5” card; now it’s covered with dark splotches where I’ve splattered brine and vinegar and alum water.  Even though I’ve rewritten the recipe, and adjusted it a bit, I still look at Mom’s card before Husband and I begin the tradition of making pickles.

            Following Mom’s recipe, the first time, we washed four gallons of whole cucumbers and placed them in a big crock churn. Then we poured a brine solution, made of four cups of coarse salt and two gallons of water, over them, and let the cucumbers soak for seven days.

            Step two is drain the cucumbers and wash them in cold water.  Slice and put the cucumbers back into the churn and cover them with cold water, in which two or three ounces of powdered alum has been added.  Soak two days.  Imagine how slimy and slick cucumbers were after seven days in salt water.  They felt and looked like they should have been thrown away! The next year, I sliced the cucumbers before soaking them in brine and I’ve never touched a slimy, icky cucumber again.

            My pickles tasted like Mom’s, but hers were evenly sliced while some of mine were paper-thin and some 1/4” thick.  A few years later, Husband got a counter-top food slicer and pickle making became much simpler, for me, not him.  He cuts every slice the same thickness, and finally, our pickles taste and look like Mom’s.

            Step three is drain the sliced cucumbers well and put them back in the churn.  Cover them with one gallon of cold cider vinegar and let them sit for one day and one night.

            Step four is drain and pour all cucumbers out of the churn, but don’t wash them.  Empty one or two boxes of pickling spices in a cloth bag, or a square of cloth, and tie it with strong thread or twine.  Place the spices into the bottom of churn.  Alternate layers of cucumbers and sugar, about ten pounds, until all the cucumbers are covered.

            About 24 hours later, a sugar syrup will begin to form and eventually cover the cucumbers.  Shake the churn occasionally to dissolve the sugar.  The last line Mom wrote reads, “Leave in the churn and use as you like.”  I like that – don’t can – just eat, and we do that well!

            My favorite summertime sandwich is American cheese, sliced tomatoes, and sweet pickles.  I dice pickles for tuna and chicken and potato salads. If I forget to serve pickles for a family meal, a Grand does it for me.  And friends are glad when I serve cheese cubes, crackers and pickles as an appetizer.

            During these days when life hasn’t been like past summers, it feels good to have two full churns sitting in our kitchen.  Summer just wouldn’t be summer without making Mom’s sweet pickles.

S’mores and More

“Come for supper.  We’ll build a fire.  Hotdogs and s’mores,” Daughter wrote in her text invitation.  She knew she had me with two words:  fire and s’mores.

            Daughter’s family has a hand-stacked brick fire ring, big enough to burn two-foot long logs and for many people to sit around.   She and I celebrated Mother’s Day sitting with our feet near a fire and dodging the smoke.  That day we didn’t make s’mores; we were happy just to watch the fire and visit. 

            When I was a kid, Dad sometimes built a wood fire on the trash burning fire spot near our garden to cook hotdogs and roast marshmallows.  He’d cut long branches from a nearby tree, and using his pocket knife, he sharpened one end of the branches so we could thread the hot dogs, longways, onto the sticks and hold the them over the fire.  I cooked and gobbled my hot dog quickly to get to the marshmallows. 

            There’s an art to roasting the perfect marshmallow – golden brown and crunchy on the outside and melted on the inside.  Mom taught patience and she told me to turn the stick slowly so all sides of the marshmallow would brown evenly.  Never hold a marshmallow directly over flames unless you want it burned black.  I’ve always doubted those who claim to like burned marshmallows.  How could burned sugar taste good?

            Daughter’s family uses two-prong metal roasting sticks and those are perfect for hotdogs.  The prongs are spaced apart for piecing the two ends of hotdogs and several can be roasted at the same time.  To roast marshmallows, I put one on each prong and held the stick near a log, not flaming, but hot red embers, and I slowly turned the stick. 

            Before the marshmallow crust began to turn to brown, it drooped.  The metal stick warmed the marshmallow inside and the pieced hole got bigger.  “Mom, they’re going to fall off.  They’re hot enough,” Daughter said.  Maybe hot inside, but not brown and crunchy on the outside.  I continued to turn the stick slowly and the marshmallows looked like drawings of elongated raindrops.

            Finally, I declared them done and Daughter held two graham crackers ready.  One topped with two rectangles of a Hershey’s milk chocolate bar.  The other with a Reece’s peanut butter cup.  “Ever tried a Reece’s s’more?  Some people really like them,” she said.   I love Reece’s cups, that combination of chocolate and peanut butter, so I tried a new s’more taste. 

            Some things shouldn’t be messed with.  My second s’more was perfect.  A crunchy, browned, melted marshmallow and warm milk chocolate candy between two graham crackers.  As I licked the melted marshmallow that oozed between the crackers, Husband said, “You know they make cinnamon and chocolate graham crackers.  Those would probably make good s’mores.”             Maybe, but someone else can try those.  I’m declaring myself a s’more traditionalist and the next time I’m invited for hotdogs and s’mores, I might even take my own stick, cut from a tree branch.

Fried Pies

Fried Apple Pies

September 1, 2017

After trying several dough recipes, I came up with this.

2 ½ cups plain flour      

1 T. baking powder

1 t. salt

1 T sugar

2 T. Crisco

1 ½ T butter

½ cup buttermilk

½ cup skim milk

Sift dry ingredients.  Cut Crisco and butter into dry ingredients with a pastry cutter.

Stir in milk only until all dry ingredients are wet. 

On a floured surface, lightly knead the dough a few times.  Cut dough into 14 or 15 equal size balls.

Gently roll each ball into a circle, about 6” diameter.

Place about 2 T dried apple in each circle. 

Fry in electric skillet at 350-375 degrees with about ¼” oil to cover the bottom of the pan.

AUNT DORIS’s recipe  November 20, 2001

1 1/3 cup Self Rising flour

1 cup sifted plain flour with ½ t salt.

2 T Crisco

1 T butter

½ cup buttermilk*

½ cup milk*

*about

Miss Daisy Celebrates Tennessee

2 ½ cups plain flour

1 T baking powder

1 T sugar

1 t. salt

1/3 cups shorting

1 beaten egg

6 ½ oz can evaportated milk

Chill dough 24 hours

Makes 24 small pies

Chocolate Fried Pies from http://www.southernplate.com

 Ingredients

  • 2 Cups all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ cup shortening
  • ½ cup milk, more if needed

filling

  • 2 cups sugar
  • 6 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • ½ cup (1 stick) butter or margarine, melted

Some Foods Don’t Go Together

Some foods naturally go together.  Peanut butter and jelly.  Dried beans and cornbread.  Bacon and eggs.  Hamburgers and French fries.  Red beans and rice.  And one of my favorite combos is baked beans and cole slaw.

            But there are some food combinations that create flavors and appearances that aren’t to my liking.  Recently, I was served salty, savory sweet potato fries with a white dipping sauce.  Assuming it was ranch dressing, I dipped a fry into the sauce.  The flavor wasn’t what I had excepted. A second bite confirmed that the sauce tasted like marshmallows.  To be sure my taste buds weren’t tricking me, I asked the waiter, and he said, “We just discovered warm marshmallow cream is the perfect dipping sauce for savory sweet potatoes.  Isn’t it great!” I tell my Grands that they should try a food they don’t like at least ten times, so maybe after nine more times I’ll agree with the waiter.

            Following a recipe for a simple warm fruit casserole, I dumped several cans of drained fruits into a dish, added a dash of cinnamon and thought it would be a delicious side dish for baked ham at a big family meal. If I’d closed my eyes while eating, the fruit might have tasted good, but the cherries colored the sauce and pears pink. The peaches and apricots took on a color that would be beautiful in a sunset, but wasn’t appealing on a plate. 

            Food shouldn’t be pink, except for strawberry fluff, a combination of strawberry gelatin and Cool Whip, and strawberry ice cream and yogurt.  Ketchup belongs on French fries – not stirred into mashed potatoes or scrambled eggs.  Even green eggs as in Dr. Seuss’s book, Green Eggs and Ham, are more appealing than pink eggs.

            Everyone ate unusual food combinations as a child.  My children dipped chips and French fries in orange ketchup, aka French dressing.  A friend said that she and her mother ate a special salad they made by layering lettuce, chopped dill pickles, sliced hot dogs, a serving of cottage cheese and then topped it with Catalina dressing.  I’ve never seen that on a menu. How about hot dog slices in potato soup?  Reddish-pink blobs in white soup doesn’t fire up my appetite.

            Do you remember the first time you were offered pineapple and ham pizza?  I thought, ‘That’s just not right.’  After watching Daughter eat it several times, I tried it and agree it’s good, but I prefer veggies and Canadian ham pizza.

            What’s better than popcorn with melted butter?  Some have tried to convince me to season popcorn with soy sauce or hot pepper sauce or chili sauce, and I expect to hear about mustard or ketchup drizzled on popcorn. 

            Husband and I both like a good peanut butter sandwich.  He makes his with sweet pickles, lettuce, tomato, onion, and a generous slathering of Miracle Whip.  Like I said, some foods naturally go together and topping the list is peanut butter and jelly.  Make my grape jelly.

What’s the Best Strawberry Shortcake?

“How about strawberry shortcake?” my friend Diane asked. Strawberry shortcake, a perfect springtime dessert. My mouth watered remembering how Mom made it. A square serving of a one layer yellow cake, cut in half. The bottom half covered with fresh sliced strawberries that had been mixed with sugar and refrigerated to make syrup. The other cake half placed on top, then more strawberries and extra juice drizzled to saturate the cake. And topped with a dollop of homemade whipped cream.

I reminded myself that everyone didn’t make this dessert like Mom did when Diane served her mother’s version. A sweet biscuit sliced in half, served side by side. Topped with slice sweetened strawberries and Cool Whip and garnished with a big berry. It was good. Diane and I discussed and laughed about how we cook like our mothers.

One time I took shortcuts and served sweetened strawberries piled onto dessert shells, those round yellow store-bought cakes packaged in cellophane. I squirted whipped topping and put a berry on top. It wasn’t what my taste buds were trained to expect when my ears hear the words strawberry shortcake.

I’ve seen and eaten many variations of this dessert. Trifle bowls layered with cubes of angel food cake, dry sliced strawberries, and whipped topping. Meringue shells filled with berries. A two layer white or yellow cake with crushed sweet berries and whipped cream between layers and on top. Even pound cake, vanilla ice cream, and sweeten sliced berries.

With so many variables no wonder there are many recipes. Cake or biscuit or shortcake or meringue? Sliced or whole berries? Sweeten or not? Juicy berries or not? Whipped cream or whipped topping or ice cream?

I googled strawberry shortcake recipes and about 9,900,000 results are available. The very first one was a combination of Diane and my mothers’ recipes. Mom’s sliced sweetened berries with juice and real whipped cream, and Diane’s mother’s sweet biscuit. And I learned the definition of shortcake is a sweetened biscuit.

The first known recipe for strawberry cakes was published in an 1845 Columbus, Ohio newspaper. It was a British version with an unleavened biscuit, layered with strawberries, covered with a hard icing, and topped with more strawberries.  The addition of whipped cream came much later. And the recipe for strawberry shortcake with a sweet biscuit or cake, berries, and whipped cream is an American creation, first published in1862 in Rochester, New York.

Classic strawberry shortcake is made with sliced and sweetened strawberries. According to Betty Crocker, macerated berries. Macerating infuses flavor into food, usually fruit, by soaking it in a liquid. So when berries are tossed with sugar, the juices are drawn out and their flavor enhanced. Toss the berries with sugar an hour or two before serving for juicy firm berries.

While strawberries are in season, maybe I’ll try the recipe with traditional sweet biscuits, sliced juicy berries, and real whipped cream. But it won’t be like Mom’s strawberry shortcake, the world’s best strawberry shortcake.

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All Deviled Eggs Aren’t the Same

What a spread! Tell the members of a southern Sunday school class to come to a party and bring a finger food and the dining room table will be full. Pork slider sandwiches. Ham on rolls, Meatballs. Veggies and dip. Cheese and crackers. Cupcakes. Brownies. Pimento cheese sandwiches – some on deli wheat bread, some on thin white bread cut in triangles. Four platters of deviled eggs – some garnished with pimento, some with paprika dusting, and some square shaped.

Yes, square deviled eggs. The conversations about those eggs were lively. I’ve never seen a square egg. How was that done? I never knew a hen could lay a square egg. Who brought these? Are these real eggs? Does a square egg taste like other eggs?

There were many guesses of how an oval egg (actually an ovoid shape since that’s the word to describe a three-dimensional egg shape) could become a cube. Eggs could be broken and the insides placed in a cube shape and then boiled. Rare chickens laid cube eggs. Peel a boiled egg and trim the white to make a cube.

Finally, when someone asked, “Who brought these?” in MaryDell’s hearing, she took credit, but she didn’t immediately explain how she turned an egg into a cube. Several of us guessed and she just smiled and shook her head. “There’s a little plastic cube to put boiled eggs in. I’ll bring it to Sunday school and show you,” she said.

MaryDell held her Egg Cuber, aka Square Egg Maker, in hand and explained. Boil an egg and peel it immediately. While it’s warm, place it in the cube, put the top on and gently turn the top which forces a square insert to press the egg into a cube. Then put the cuber in the refrigerator for about an hour, remove the egg from the plastic cuber, and refrigerate the square egg. “Since boiled eggs are good in the refrigerator for a week, you can make them ahead and then devil them all at the same time,” MaryDell said.

“Wait.” I said, “Did you say boil an egg? Can you only do one at a time?” MaryDell nodded. “You brought two platters of eggs. I can’t imagine how long that took,” I said.

Turns out MaryDell owns two Egg Cubers so she did two eggs at a time over several days. I admitted that I had hurriedly slapped store-bought pimento cheese between slices of sandwich bread, trimmed the crusts, and cut sandwiches in triangles. “Just hearing everyone talk about square eggs made it worthwhile. Your Grands would love them,” MaryDell said. Her deviled eggs were unique and delicious. None were left on her platter; I can’t say the same for my sandwiches.

Egg Cubers are available online and probably in kitchen stores, but I’m not buying one yet. MaryDell loaned me one of hers. I appreciate my friend’s time and effort to make two platters of square deviled eggs, but at my house we’ll make a square egg and eat it as soon as it chills. The Grands will love it.

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